8 Tips for Friends and Family Fundraising

This is a Guest blog post from Andre Averbug.

 

Friends and family investing fundraising seed capital

Startup fundraising is never easy and the current pandemic crisis makes it even harder. Typical early-stage investors, such as angel investors and venture capital funds, today might be more reluctant to take risks and bet on early-stage startups. In such situations, entrepreneurs often turn to friends and family (2F’s) to support their endeavors.

Asking people close to you for money, however, has its challenges and needs to be done in a planned, sensible way. Here are a few best practices to follow:

1. Select potential leads carefully – Make a list of potential investors among friends and family based on two key factors: net-worth and personality. In terms of the former, you should only consider people you know have the resources to support you. Don’t put people close to you on the spot if you don’t think they can afford to lose the investment. If the business fails, you don’t want to see them struggling financially, no matter the circumstances. Regarding the latter, only approach people you have a good relationship with and that you think have the right temperament. Make sure the person is reasonable and understanding. Remember they will become your partners (or lenders) and business partnerships are often hard to manage. Money comes at a very high cost if the person is difficult to deal with or might freak out at the first adversity and become a headache for you and your other partners.

2. Prioritize those who might help – From your list above, try to identify people who might be business savvy, well connected, and who can bring something else to the table besides money. For example, prioritize the uncle who is a corporate executive or entrepreneur, and might help you with mentoring and contacts in the industry, over a friend who might even be more well-off, but is a medical doctor or an artist with no business knowhow or networks.

3. Approach them professionally – Just because these are people close to you and that you know might be inclined to help, it doesn’t mean you shouldn’t be professional when approaching them. Quite the opposite. Show them you are serious about your business and that you are proposing a business partnership that runs parallel to your personal relationships. Only approach them when you know exactly how much money you need and for what: present them with a use of funds table. Make them a compelling presentation of your business case and bring (or send them) printouts of your business planLean Canvas, or executive summary. They will appreciate your professionalism.

4. Think through instrument options – Make sure you understand all investment instrument options before you approach friends and family because you will need to explain it to them. For example, are you selling shares of your company (equity)? If so, at what valuation (make sure it is not overvalued to be fair to them)? Do you want a loan (debt) and, if so, under what terms, ideally? Are you considering convertible notes, where the investment starts as a loan and can be converted into equity at the next round of investment, at a discounted valuation? The latter, by the way, is likely the best option for early stage startups. [Note: I will be covering these instruments in a future post – stay tuned by signing up to receive notifications of new posts by email].

5. Make them comfortable to say “no” – Unlike professional investors like angels and VC funds, these people are listening to you specifically because they like you and want to help you personally. Therefore, you have the moral obligation to not take advantage of that (which you might do unconsciously) and you must put them in a comfortable spot. After presenting your pitch and explaining how much you need, for what, and under what terms, answer all the questions they have, and give them time to think. Don’t ask for an answer on the same day (unless of course it is a clear negative) and tell them to sleep on the offer and come back to you on a later day.

6. Consider a “2F club” – Depending on the amount of money you are asking and the number of people on your list, it might be a good idea to have more people invest smaller pieces. For example, instead of getting $50,000 from your big sister, get 5 x $10,000 from her and four other friends. This is good for diluting any one person’s risk and might also provide you with extra help. If you are going for equity, though, be mindful of having too many people as partners – i.e., too many voices at the table. Get help from a corporate lawyer or legal mentor to design an effective way for these people to become your partners, perhaps by having them all come in through a company of their own, with each owning 20% of it.

7. Tell what you expect (and don’t) from them – When friends and family invest, with their best intentions, they often want to help in many other ways too. They may want to opine on the business strategy, suggest hires, introduce you to this or that person, try the product before you launch it etc. If not managed properly, this situation can escalate to your aunt, who’s a dentist, wanting to participate in your biggest contract negotiation! Therefore, before the investment deal is closed, make sure you tell them the level of involvement you expect from them. You may simply not want them to get involved at all, which is fine, as long as this is part of the agreement and they are ok with it. In any case, keep in mind that, as partners, they do have the right to at least receive updates and participate in quarterly or biannual meetings.

8. Be 100% transparent about the risks! – Avoid problems in the future. These are people you care about and may know nothing about startup investing. They are doing this because they care about you too. Ensure they are aware that this is a risky endeavor and that they might lose their investment (equity) or that you may take a long time to pay them back (debt) if the business fails. Certify that they are ok with the risks and that they can afford losing their investment without major personal financial consequences.

Times of crisis call far stringent cost management measures and creative fundraising, including from friends and family. If you do it right, the 2F’s can be a good option to help you through these troubled waters.

 

Andre portrait

Andre Averbug is an entrepreneur, economist, and writer. He has over two decades of international experience working in the intersection of economic development, entrepreneurship, and innovation. He has worked and lived in multiple countries across North and South America, Europe, Africa, and Central Asia.

Andre has started and run four startups, in Brazil and the US, and was awarded Global Innovator of the Year in 2009 by World Bank’s infoDev. He has extensive experience supporting companies as mentor and consultant, both independently and as part of incubators such as 1776 and the Kosmos Innovation Center, and programs like Shell LIVEWire, StartUp Weekend and WeXchange.

As an economist, Andre has worked in topics ranging from innovation ecosystems, entrepreneurship and MSME development policy, competitiveness, business climate, infrastructure finance, monitoring and evaluation (M&E), and country assistance strategy for the World Bank, the Inter-American Development Bank (IDB), and the Brazilian Development Bank (BNDES). He has also consulted for clients such as DAI Global, the Economist Intelligence Unit (EIU), TechnoServe, among many others. He holds a master’s degree in economics from the University of London (UK) and an MBA from McGill University (Canada). Andre lives in the Washington, DC area.

He writes an awesome Blog called Entrepreneurship Compass and you can sign up here: https://entrepreneurshipcompass.com

 

 

Impact of new Lease Standards on Tech and Life Sciences Companies

This is a Guest blog post from Ling Zhang., CPA.

With many companies struggling to fully implement the last ...

 

When the Financial Accounting Standards Board (FASB) met on May 20, 2020 to address the impacts of the COVID-19 pandemic, they voted on a one-year effective date deferral of Accounting Standards Codification (ASC) Topic 842, Leases, which will result in a modified effective date for private companies and certain private not-for-profit entities for fiscal years beginning after Dec. 15, 2021, and interim periods with fiscal years beginning after Dec. 15, 2022, once the final standard is issued (expected June 2020). Private companies in technology and life sciences, particularly with significant operating lease activity under current lease accounting guidance, can take advantage of the delayed ASC 842 effective date to prepare for implementation.  

FASB originally issued Accounting Standards Update (ASU) 2016-02 in February 2016. Accounting Standards Codification (ASC) Topic 842, Leases, along with several subsequently issued related ASUs, which amended the accounting guidance for leases.

GENERAL ASC 842 REQUIREMENTS

Under ASC 842, a company is required to recognize leases with terms greater than 12 months on its balance sheet. Specifically, lessees are required to recognize the following at lease commencement:

ASC 842 represents a change for operating leases that were historically considered “off balance sheet” obligations. FASB believes a balance sheet presentation of leases will provide a clearer view of a company’s future commitments with operating leases recognized on the balance sheet.

Under ASC 842, leases recorded on the balance sheet will be classified as either finance leases or operating leases, which will determine the presentation of the related expense in the income statement. Finance lease arrangements will result in depreciation and interest expense recorded each reporting period similar in manner to existing capital leases under legacy guidance. Operating lease ROU assets and liabilities will be amortized and accreted, respectively, to develop a straight-line rent expense presented as lease expense in the income statement.

SPECIFIC CONSIDERATIONS FOR TECHNOLOGY AND LIFE SCIENCES COMPANIES

The delayed ASC 842 effective date provides additional time for technology and life sciences companies to prepare for implementation. Specific considerations prior to implementation include:

1. Impact to Balance Sheet and Financial Ratios

Technology and life sciences companies should expect increases in balance sheet amounts (e.g., long-term assets and both current and long-term liabilities) for operating leases. Companies with significant existing operating leases may be surprised by the impact on reported balance sheet amounts. These financial statement changes may impact certain financial ratios, including current ratio, leverage ratio and debt service coverage ratios.

Example: How ASC 842 Can Affect Key Metrics

As many technology and life science companies use cash flow-based lending, the example below provides the potential effects on the balance sheet and the associated debt service coverage ratio. Some do not consider operating lease liabilities as ‘debt’ for purposes of calculating debt-based ratios and you can expect that there may be diversity in practice. Technology and life science companies should confirm with their lenders in advance their view of the treatment of ASC 842 operating lease liabilities with regard to covenant calculations.  Understanding the impact on key metrics early is advised. The following is an example showing the impact on certain ratios when operating lease liabilities are considered debt.

Balance Sheet Impact

Notice how the reporting of ROU assets and lease liabilities increases the total amount of assets and liabilities on the balance sheet after adopting the new standard.1

Balance Sheet
Prior to adopting ASC 842 After adopting ASC 842
Cash  $                    500,000  $                  500,000
Accounts receivable                        750,000                      750,000
Inventory                     2,000,000                   2,000,000
Total current assets                     3,250,000                   3,250,000
PPE                        500,000                      500,000
Capitalized software                     1,500,000                   1,500,000
Operating lease ROU asset                                 –                      900,000
Total non-current assets                     2,000,000                   2,900,000
Total assets                     5,250,000                   6,150,000
Deferred revenue  $                 2,100,000  $               2,100,000
Accounts payable and accruals                        550,000                      550,000
Long-term debt, current                        100,000                      100,000
Operating lease liability, current                                 –                      250,000
Total current liabilities                     2,750,000                   3,000,000
Long-term debt, net of current portion                        400,000                      400,000
Operating lease liability, net of current portion                                 –                      650,000
Total non-current liabilities                        400,000                   1,050,000
Total liabilities                     3,150,000                   4,050,000
Equity                     2,100,000                   2,100,000
Total liabilities and equity  $                 5,250,000  $               6,150,000

1) In this example, it is assumed that the lease liability in an operating lease. However, if the lease liability was classified as a finance lease, the ROU asset could be included within PPE.

Debt Service Coverage Ratio Impact

Debt service ratio coverage is a common financial covenant found in debt agreements. As illustrated below, the ratio may significantly change with the adoption of the Standard.

Debt Service Coverage Ratio
Prior to adopting ASC 842 After adopting ASC 842
Net income                                  500,000                                500,000
Depreciation expense                                    50,000                                  50,000
Interest expense                                    20,000                                  20,000
                                 570,000                                570,000
Interest expense                                    20,000                                  20,000
Current portion debt
and capitalized leases
                                 100,000                                350,000
                                 120,000                                370,000
Debt service coverage ratio                                        4.75                                       1.54

 

Many technology and life sciences companies may find that certain metrics and loan covenants are impacted due to the changes in the balance sheet as a result of adoption. Companies should give priority to their financial statement and disclosure changes for the purpose of maintaining compliance with their loan covenants. As previously discussed, companies should also engage in early communication with their lenders regarding the potential impact on financial covenants and whether the lenders will take these changes into consideration when analyzing the company’s performance.

2. Lease Population Completeness Considerations

During the ASC 842 transition, all leases should be identified. While many leases may seem straightforward, such as leases for real estate or equipment, others may be embedded within other service contracts. For example, a router that is utilized as part of an internet service arrangement may be considered a leased asset. By electing the package of three transition practical expedients, companies are allowed to not reassess the following:

  • whether any expired or existing contracts are or contain leases;
  • lease classification for any expired or existing leases; and
  • indirect direct costs for any existing leases.

 

Embedded leases are commonly found in the following arrangements:

A lease exists if a contract conveys to a company the right to obtain substantially all of the economic benefits from use of the identified asset and the company directs the use of the identified asset. An identified asset must be physically distinct and specified in the contract. The existence of substitution rights may indicate a specific asset has not been identified. Under Topic 842, substantive substitution rights exist when a supplier has the practical ability to substitute alternative assets throughout the period of use, and the supplier would benefit economically from the exercise of its right to substitute the asset. When evaluating the existence of a lease, companies also need to assess if the use of the identified asset is significant. If another party’s use of the identified asset is more than insignificant, the contract does not convey control of the identified asset, therefore, the contract does not contain a lease.

 

The following are some examples where judgement and further analysis may be required to determine the presence of a lease component.

 

REVENUE CONTRACT WITH CUSTOMER – SUBSTITUTION RIGHT

A: SaaS contract with hosting arrangement – identified asset without substantive substitution rights

Facts: A software company enters into contracts with its customers to host software on the software company’s servers, each of which is designated to a specific customer. The contracts do not allow the software company to substitute the server for another one without consent of its customers.

 

Analysis: An embedded lease may exist (even without an explicit lease agreement) considering that the server is dedicated to a specific customer, and the software company does not have “substantive substitution” rights for the server.

 

B:  SaaS contract with use of equipment – identified asset with substantive substitution rights

Facts: A company enters into a contract with a customer that includes SaaS services and the use of a designated computer medical cart through the term of the SaaS services. The company has the option to swap the medical cart with another one at any time.

 

Analysis: The Company can swap the medical cart with another one at any time during the term of the contract. Therefore, the “substantive substitution” rights criteria has been met, and the use of the computer medial cart is not considered a lease.

 

MEDICAL SUPPLIES PURCHASE CONTRACT – IDENTIFIED ASSET WITHOUT SUBSTANTIVE SUBSTITUTION RIGHTS

Facts: A bio-tech company enters into a medical supplies contract, which requires the purchase of consumables and test kits for research and development purposes exclusively from this supplier for the term of five years. As part of the arrangement, the supplier also provides the equipment for testing at no charge. The equipment is installed and customized for the bio-tech company, and the contract does not allow the supplier to substitute another equipment without the approval of the bio-tech company.

 

Analysis: A lease may exist since the equipment is specified in the contract and designated to the bio-tech company; At the inception of the contract, the supplier does not have substantive substitution rights to the equipment and it is not feasible that the equipment can be easily substituted by the supplier.

 

INFORMATION TECHNOLOGY (IT) SERVICE CONTRACT – IDENTIFIED ASSET WITHOUT SUBSTANTIVE SUBSTITUTION RIGHTS

Facts: A technology company enters into a network services and security agreement with an electronic data storage provider. The services are provided through a centralized data center and use a specified server (Server No. 9). The supplier maintains many identical servers in a single accessible location and determines, at inception of the contract, that it is permitted to and can easily substitute another server without the customer’s consent throughout the period of use.

 

Analysis: Based on the facts above, the vendor can interchange the underlying asset without the customer’s consent. As the asset is interchangeable in nature and service and is not dependent upon the specific asset, there is no lease based upon the “substantive substitution” rights criteria.

 

ADVERTISING CONTRACT – SIGNIFICANCE OF USE

Facts: A company enters into a marketing services agreement which encompasses a variety of marketing and advertising vehicles, one of which includes electronic billboards.

 

Analysis: Although this contract could be written as a marketing services agreement, the right to use one or more billboards may result in a lease if the billboard is specifically identifiable and dedicated to the company, and the company obtains significant use of the billboards throughout the term of the contract. Understanding if other parties have the right to advertise on the billboards and the significance of those other arrangements will be important to determining if a lease exists.

 

Considerable judgement is involved for each example when reviewing a contract for embedded leases. A slight alteration in facts and circumstances may result in a different conclusion. Keep in mind that if there is a specifically identified asset dedicated to a party, it is likely to contain a lease. Further, predominance and significance of the activity will impact lease related decisions and conclusions.

 

3. Negotiation of Future Arrangements

The impact of ASC 842 may be an important factor in evaluating whether to structure the acquisition of assets as lease arrangements or purchase arrangements going forward. Further, Topic 842 may have implications on other accounting standards such as revenue recognition. The consideration of future arrangements will be particularly important for companies with significant lease activities as many such lease arrangements may move on to the balance sheet under the ASC 842. Technology and life sciences companies should identify and perform an inventory of all existing leases, including embedded leases, in conjunction with forecasting needs for future assets. The company can then evaluate and plan for these future needs with a clear understanding of the trade-offs between lease and purchase arrangements.

 

4. Tax Impact

ASC 842 will have a noticeable impact on financial reporting for lessees, but the effect on taxes may not be obvious. The new lease standard does not change lease accounting for federal income tax purposes. Therefore, without a corresponding change in tax basis, deferred tax accounting may be impacted. Implementation of ASC 842 could result in new deferred tax assets, liabilities or additional book to tax differences in a company’s income tax provision. Under ASC 842, lease assets are subject to impairment, which is often reversed for tax purposes. Technology and life sciences companies should understand and plan for the potential tax impact.

 

5. Assurance Perspective

Technology and life sciences companies audited by an independent public accounting firm should maintain relevant documentation of the ASC 842 implementation process, as the independent auditor may require the documentation in order to complete the audit. Such documentation should include evaluation of lease classification as finance or operating, selection and application of the transition method, discussion of any practical expedients applied, basis for significant assumptions such as discount rate and the company’s lease identification completeness procedures, including evaluation of embedded leases.

 

6. Future Operations, Processes and Related Controls

To comply with ASC 842, companies will likely need to implement changes to their current control environments and business processes. Companies should establish policies and procedures to address ongoing considerations such as initial assessments of new contracts, appropriate interest rates and lease modifications, as well as develop methods to appropriately capture financial disclosure information. Significant judgement will be required to assess lease terms through an ASC 842 lens, specifically related to lease term, allocation of lease payments to lease and non-lease components, and remeasurement events.

 

CONCLUSION

By delaying the effective date for non-public business entities, FASB has created an opportunity for technology and life sciences companies to fully consider the impact of ASC 842 and prepare for the upcoming transition.

 

As a Senior Manager in the DHG Technology practice, Ling Zhang, CPA, works closely with client management and C-suite executives to provide audit, financial accounting advisory, and risk advisory services to multi-national publicly-traded corporations and private companies with revenues ranging from $10 million to $50 billion. She advises clients on SEC filings, complex debt and equity transactions, merger and acquisition, new accounting guidance implementation, internal control system design and implementation, and financial statements reporting and disclosures. She can be reached at ling.zhang@dhg.com.